Sea Walnut…

The stealthy predator Mnemiopsis leidyi, also known as the sea walnut, uses tiny hairs, called cilia, to create a current which prey don’t notice until they are sucked into its mouth region, surrounded by two large oral lobes. The sea walnut swims using fused cilia, which diffract light in many colors in this photo.

Mnemiopsis leidyi, as it’s formally called, is a ctenophore, a group of simple animals often described as jellyfish that propel themselves using tiny hairs, called cilia.

These jellyfish are native to the Atlantic Coast of the Americas, but they can be successful, even devastating, when introduced elsewhere. In the 1980s they showed up in the Black Sea, most likely transported by ships, and multiplied. Within a few years, the Black Sea’s anchovy fishery collapsed. Mnemiopsis was one of the culprits, since it both competes with the filter-feeding fish for food and also consumes anchovy eggs and larvae.

Mnemiopsis has also established itself elsewhere, including the eastern Mediterranean, the Caspian Sea, the Adriatic Sea, the Baltic Sea, parts of the North Sea, and elsewhere, according to the scientists.

 Photo Credit: Lars Johan Hansson
Information :Life Science
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The Thimble jellyfish and swimmer’s itch…

The thimble jellyfish is the half-inch long and is found in the north Atlantic, Arctic and northern Pacific coastal waters during spring and early summer. It has four tentacles, that are covered with the usual nematocysts that discharge the toxins. This jellyfish is known to feed on crustacean plankton and barnacle larvae. It swims intermittently and then holds still with its tentacles extended. A passing prey is captured when it comes in contact with its tentacles. The toxins in the tentacles will immobilize the small prey and they will bend inwards to take the prey to the mouth where it is ingested and digested.

The sting of the thimble jellyfish is not deadlybut will usually cause a burning and itching. The thimble jelly is also hard to detect, but actually it is the larvae of this jellyfish that causes the main problem to bathers in the Caribbean. These larvae are often refereed to as sea lice, and cause a lot of painful rash, called the “seabather’s eruption” on the victim. They are very tiny and you wont know that you have been affected until the rash appears. These tiny jellyfish usually will get caught in between the swim suit and the skin of the person. The parts that get rubbed will get the most infestations, like the inner thighs, armpits, neck and so on.  StingMate provides very effective relief on the rash discomfort.

Thimbles are usually found in blooms..

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Neon Jellyfish found in Tasmanian Waters…

Jellyfish have always been adept in springing surprises at humans. One such surprise was encountered by a Jellyfish expert Lisa Gershwin in Tasmania. Lisa is responsible for the Jellyfish department of the local Museum and art gallery. She was out swimming in Tasmania, near a local jetty, when she saw a Jellyfish with light being emitted from its body. This was her 159th discovery of Jellyfish.
Jellyfish do not have any kind of pigments in its body which emit light. But the neon Jellyfish are just a creation of light reflection. The cilia or hair like extensions on the body of these Jellyfish helps them in loco motion. When the light falls on these cilia and is reflected back, there is a beautiful rainbow formation with the Jellyfish looking like as if it is self illuminated.

But these neon Jellyfish are quite small, only 13 cms in length. The beauty of these creatures is quite short lived as they are very fragile and can shatter in to pieces on hitting a net.  These neon Jellyfish are also called as Rainbow Jellyfish. They look as dazzling as a colorful Rainbow with their myriad of colors. It is a visual delight to see them at night or in dimly lighted waters. The rainbow colors glow so vibrantly in the background of the dark black waters at night.

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Bluefire Jellyfish..Japan

The Blue Jellyfish is also known as Bluefire Jellyfish, scientific name Cyanea lamarckii. It is a jellyfish species of the Cyneidae family and is likely to be known as Cyanea capillata nozakii or Cyanea nozakii among populations in Western Pacific of Japan. Blue Jellyfish also sting and have their own unique effects. It’s important to realize that almost all jellyfish sting but the degree of the sting is contingent on the species in question and how your body reacts to a sting. As such, the typical effects and symptoms of a jellyfish sting can range from a simple rash to an angry blister that requires urgent medical attention.
Blue Jellyfish sting effects include intense hurtful pain, wheals, and rash while its progressive effects include vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, fever, sweating, chills, swelling of the lymph nodes, back and abdominal pain, among others. In case you are the type of person who reacts severely on stings, the blue jellyfish sting effects might make it difficult for you to breath. It can also lead into a coma and to some very extreme cases death if the venom spreads widely into your blood.

In case a blue jelly fish stings you, you don’t have to wait for the effects to show before treating it. First off, you should rinse the affected areas using sea water. You should by all means avoid fresh water as it will only exacerbate the pain. Don’t rub the affected area, neither should you apply ice on it, instead, let it to cool off on its own. Blue jellyfish sting effects might also leave you with tentacles on, which should be removed sparingly using tweezers. Never rub them off using your bare hands. Your aim should be to put out of action the extremity since any slight movement can make the poison spread.

Severe blue jellyfish sting effects would require you to seek further medical attention.

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The Square Jellyfish…

The square jellyfish is a vivid description of the anatomical appearance of this kind of jellyfish which appears cuboidal in shape. Usually referred to as the box jellyfish belonging to the Cubozoa class and the number of species total to over 19. The best known square jellyfish is the Chironex fleckeri which holds the most toxic poison in the entire animal kingdom. The venom targets the cardio-respiratory system. The breathing muscles collapse and the stung person dies from suffocation, shock and from the pain which has been described as extremely overbearing. Statistically, the box jellyfish is the prime killer, ahead of all other animal dangers including sharks and the salty water crocodiles in the Australian region where they are found in abundance.  Box jellyfish are camouflage experts. They are transparent pale blue, which makes them hardly noticeable in the water. That means that if one was to sting you, you would hardly see it coming. The box jellyfish prefer the warm waters, in contrast to other species.

It’s important to note at this point that not all species of square or box jellyfish are fatal to human. This is reserved to only a few of these, with the C. fleckeri, being the most venomous among them.

5% acetic acid has proven an  effective first aid but if you are stung by the Box, go immediately to the hospital for medical treatment.

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Sand Jellyfish…

Sand Jellyfish (Rhopilema asamushi or Rhopilema esculenta) is a species of jellyfish from the genus Rhopilema. Other species of jellyfish belonging to this group include Rhopilema hispidum and Rhopilema nomadic. They are inhabitants of the Indian Ocean and are found in locations like Hong Kong, Malaysia, Japan, China and some parts of the North Atlantic coastline. This species of jellyfish is very to rare to find in marine waters around the American coastlines.

Sand jellyfish is so called because of their distinct coloration and because the surface of the skin appears to have a granular texture.  We do know that the jellyfish are capable of stinging because there are records of humans being stung by them. The effects of the sting are known to be mild, usually resulting in an itchy rash and a burning sensation. A more severe effect can occur in a sensitive individual or if one has an allergic reaction to the toxins present in the venom.

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The Crown Jellyfish….

 

Crown jellyfishes are the eight families of jellyfish that belong to the order Coronatae. They are distinguished from other jellyfish by the presence of a deep groove running around the umbrella, giving them the crown shape from which they take their name. Many of the species in the order inhabit deep sea environments.

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